Voters in the Tipp City and Bethel school districts agreed to continue supporting the schools by approving levies in the May 2 primary/special election.

The unofficial totals from the Miami County Board of Elections showed:

Tipp City Exempted Village Schools: 13.9-mill renewal levy:

For: 1,700 or 70.22 percent

Against: 721 or 29.78 percent

Bethel Local Schools Construction Levy Renewal

For: 503 or 60.17 percent

Against: 333 or 39.83 percent

Bethel Local Schools Operating Levy Renewal

For: 493 or 58.9 percent

Against: 344 or 41.10 percent

“This is a great day for our schools and our community. This underscores the value our community puts on education,” said Tipp City schools’ Superintendent Gretta Kumpf

“Once again the Bethel community has stepped up and shown their support for their students, teachers and staff. Providing a quality education for their children has always been one of their highest priorities,” said Virginia “Ginny” Potter, Bethel schools’ superintendent, “These financial resources will enable us to efficiently manage the day-to-day operations of our growing district.”

In Tipp City, the board of education agreed to seek a levy combining two operating levies that expire at year’s end and to seek a longer period of collection from the traditional four or five years to seven years.

Kumpf praised, and thanked, levy co-chairs Jim and Joellen Heatherly and their volunteers for efforts to get the word out about the levy.

The levy will continue to generate $5.6 million annually, the amount generated by two existing levies that expire at year end.

The operating money goes toward levy would pay for items such as teachers, support staff, transportation and general maintenance.

“It is wonderful,” Kumpf said of the positive news election night. “We needed this. We can continue doing great things.”

School leaders and the levy committee emphasized in the campaign that the money would be for operating and not for a new building or a stadium project. The citizens group Tipp Pride is working to raise money privately for a stadium project.

In the Bethel schools, the 7-mill, five-year levy goes for operating. It generates $1,032,718 a year. The 2-mill, five-year request for capital improvements generates $206,160 a year.

Both levies were set to expire in December.

Potter said the capital improvement levy money is earmarked for building repairs and facility needs.

More than $1 million of the renewal money would go to general expenses. Among those expenses are curriculum, transportation, athletics, fine arts and salaries.

“As the superintendent, I am humbled and encouraged by their financial sacrifice and commitment to ensure that Bethel Local Schools is “A Great Place to BEE!” Potter said election night.