The upcoming November 7, 2017 ballot will soon be seen by the citizens of New Carlisle, and it will contain the initiative petition number 4 that will propose changes in how New Carlisle processes city income taxes.

New Carlisle City Council held a special meeting on Tuesday (October 3) to pass an ordinance allowing the City to spend tax dollars for political purposes.

City Manager Randy Bridge presented New Carlisle City Council with his proposed cuts to the City’s budget at the council’s meeting on Monday.

The City of New Carlisle appeared before the Clark County Board of Elections on Thursday, August 31, 2017 for a special hearing to present their case for protesting the petition filed by Kelli Bartlett a resident of the city.

The city’s council held a meeting at Smith Field House on August 7th and while several administrative tasks were dispensed with, it was when discussion regarding acceptance of an annual allocation of county funds for the years 2018, 2019, and 2020, the room became animated.

In a work session meeting on August 3, the City Manager, Randy Bridge, met with the city council to introduce the subject of hiring a company to manage an customer online water payment system, possibly as soon as the beginning of 2018.

New Carlisle City Council introduced an ordinance at their July 3 meeting that would make it easier for residents to add porches to their buildings.

The Ohio Department of Transportation and the City of New Carlisle held a public forum last Wednesday regarding the proposed turn lanes at Main and Jefferson.

New Carlisle City Council unanimously rejected the donation of the Belle Manor building to the city.

City Manager Randy Bridge informed New Carlisle City Council at their Monday meeting that the city has received $133,040 from the sale of the Twin Creeks properties and another $130,000 from the Kennedy Trust settlement.

At Monday night’s New Carlisle City Council meeting, resident Becky McKenzie questioned Council Member Ethan Reynolds on some of his Facebook posts.

Momentum Grows for Statewide Government Transparency with Over 1,070 Local Government and School Districts Partnering with OhioCheckbook.

Back to Top